Tuesday, September 26, 2017

Translocations of North Island tomtits (Petroica macrocephala toitoi) and North Island robins (P. longipes) to Zealandia-Karori Sanctuary, an urban sanctuary. What have we learned?

TitleTranslocations of North Island tomtits (Petroica macrocephala toitoi) and North Island robins (P. longipes) to Zealandia-Karori Sanctuary, an urban sanctuary. What have we learned?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2013
AuthorsEmpson, R, Fastier, D
JournalNotornis
Volume60
Issue1
Pagination63-69
Type of ArticleFull article
KeywordsNorth Island robin, North Island tomtit, Petroica longipes, Petroica macrocephala toitoi, translocation methods, Zealandia-Karori Sanctuary
Abstract

Transfers of North Island robin (Petroica longipes) and North Island tomtit (P. macrocephala toitoi) were undertaken from various sites around the Wellington region to within the mammal-proof fence at the Zealandia-Karori Sanctuary from 2001-2004. Differing methodologies were trialled to test translocation protocols for these species. Robin translocations (34 males and 42 females from Kapiti I translocated in 2000 and 2001) were straightforward and robins established in the sanctuary despite the fence not being a physical barrier to dispersal. They bred from the first season and numbers have since increased rapidly. Tomtits were transferred from 2 source populations (Kapiti I and Akatarawas; 39 males and 12 females over 4 years from 2001-2004) but failed to establish. To hold tomtits in an aviary and avoid aggression it was necessary to keep sexes apart. Although successful tomtit breeding was observed both within and outside the sanctuary, predation pressure was higher outside the sanctuary. A progressive move of tomtit territories out of the sanctuary may have been a response to increasing aggression from the expanding robin population.

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