Sunday, October 20, 2019

Landscape-scale applications of 1080 pesticide benefit North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) and New Zealand fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) in Tongariro Forest, New Zealand

TitleLandscape-scale applications of 1080 pesticide benefit North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) and New Zealand fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) in Tongariro Forest, New Zealand
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsRobertson, HA, Guillotel, J, Lawson, T, Sutton, N
JournalNotornis
Volume66
Issue1
Pagination1-15
Type of ArticleFull article
Keywords1080 pesticide, brown kiwi, chick survival, nesting success, New Zealand fantail, pest control, population dynamics
Abstract

Data on the effects of aerial 1080 operations on non-target bird species in New Zealand are scarce and largely limited to short-term colour-banding or radio-tracking studies, or standardised call counts. During a 22-year study in Tongariro Forest, all 142 radio-tagged North Island brown kiwi (Apteryx mantelli) survived 4 landscape-scale (20,000 ha) aerial broadcast 1080 operations targeting brush-tailed possum (Trichosurus vulpecula) and rats (Rattus spp.). Furthermore, both kiwi chick survival to 6 months old and New Zealand fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) nesting success were significantly higher in the first 2 breeding seasons following the use of 1080 poison than in subsequent years of the 5-year cycle. We observed several episodes of ferret (Mustela furo) killing multiple adult kiwi, particularly in the last half of the 1080 cycle. Population modelling showed that a 5-year 1080 operation cycle resulted in population gains for 2 years, followed by declines in the remaining 3 years that largely negated these benefits. Our data thus support the shift to a 3-year 1080 operation cycle which will more likely result in this kiwi population growing at close to the 2% per year target set by the 2018–2028 Kiwi Recovery Plan.

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