Sunday, December 15, 2019

Discovery of a previously unknown Coenocorypha snipe in the Campbell Island group, New Zealand subantarctic

TitleDiscovery of a previously unknown Coenocorypha snipe in the Campbell Island group, New Zealand subantarctic
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2005
AuthorsBarker, D, Carroll, JWA, Edmonds, HK, Fraser, JR, Miskelly, CM
JournalNotornis
Volume52
Issue3
Pagination143-149
Type of Articlepaper
KeywordsCampbell Island, Coenocorypha, discovery, Jacquemart Island, recovery, rodent impacts
Abstract

A previously unknown population of Coenocorypha snipe was discovered on Jacquemart Island, a rat-free 19 ha islet adjacent to Campbell Island in the New Zealand subantarctic, on 9 November 1997. This was the first evidence of Coenocorypha snipe occurring in the Campbell Island group, which is believed to have been infested by Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) before the first naturalists visited in 1840. Rats were eradicated from 11,268 ha Campbell Island by the New Zealand Department of Conservation in July 2001. Two snipe were seen, and one caught, on Campbell Island adjacent to Jacquemart Island on 10 March 2005. The bird caught was a fully-feathered chick, indicating successful breeding on Campbell Island. The Campbell Island snipe remains undescribed and critically endangered.

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