Thursday, January 20, 2022

South Island robin (Petroica australis australis) abundance and leaf-litter invertebrates in plantation and native forest

TitleSouth Island robin (Petroica australis australis) abundance and leaf-litter invertebrates in plantation and native forest
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2007
AuthorsBorkin, KM, Goodman, AJ, Mayhew, K, Smith, E
JournalNotornis
Volume54
Issue2
Pagination65-70
Type of Articlearticle
Keywordsexotic plantation forest, invertebrate biomass, invertebrate diversity, native forest, Petroica australis australis, South Island robin
Abstract

We investigated whether the abundance of the South Island robin (Petroica australis australis) could be explained by the abundance, species richness, diversity, or evenness of leaf-litter invertebrates. We recorded robin abundance indices and collected leaf-litter invertebrates in 3 forest types: mature Douglas fir (Pseudotsuga menziesii); mature Monterey pine (Pinus radiata); and old growth kanuka-manuka (Kunzea ericoides - Leptospermum scoparium). Robins were attracted to stations using 5-min playbacks of robin full song in each forest type. Invertebrates were extracted from leaf-litter samples using ‘Tullgren-type’ heat extraction funnels. There was no significant difference between the numbers of robins detected in the Douglas fir (1.14 5 min count-1), or kanuka-manuka forest (0.86 5 min count-1), and no robins were detected in the Monterey pine forest. Kanuka-manuka forest had the greatest biomass and species richness of leaf-litter invertebrates, but the lowest evenness. We believe that the abundance of the South Island robin can not be sufficiently explained by the density or directly of leaf-litter invertebrates.

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