Sunday, November 29, 2020

Response of non-target native birds to mammalian pest control for kokako (Callaeas cinerea) in the Hunua Ranges, New Zealand

TitleResponse of non-target native birds to mammalian pest control for kokako (Callaeas cinerea) in the Hunua Ranges, New Zealand
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2009
AuthorsBaber, M, Brejaart, R, Babbitt, K, Lovegrove, T, Ussher, G
JournalNotornis
Volume56
Issue4
Pagination176-182
Type of Articlearticle
KeywordsCallaeas cinerea wilsoni, fantail, Gerygone igata, Grey Warbler, Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae, Hunua Ranges, Kereru, Kokako, pest control, Petroica macrocephala, Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae, Rhipidura fuliginosa, Tomtit, tui
Abstract

Conservation management of threatened species (single-species management) is likely to confer benefits to non-target native species, although there are few studies. We examined the relationship between the relative abundance of New Zealand pigeon/kereru (Hemiphaga novaeseelandiae), tui (Prosthemadera novaeseelandiae), grey warbler (Gerygone igata), fantail (Rhipidura fuliginosa) and tomtit (Petroica macrocephala), and intensity of mammalian pest control conducted to protect the endangered North Island kokako (Callaeas cinerea wilsoni) in the Hunua Ranges, 40 km south-east of Auckland, New Zealand. Study areas were subjected to either high intensity (Kokako Management Area, KMA) or low intensity (Milne Stream and Rata Ridge) pest control, and we established 17 monitoring stations per study area and conducted 17 x 5-minute point counts of forest birds in all 3 areas. Abundances of kereru, tui, tomtit, were significantly higher in the KMA. Our findings suggest that single-species management targeted at kokako also benefits some non-target native birds. The contribution of single species conservation management to overall ecosystem integrity is not well understood, and further research is needed to improve the ecological value and cost effectiveness of such management techniques.

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