Friday, April 26, 2019

Post-fledging migration, age of first return and recruitment, and results of inter-colony translocation of black petrels ( Procellaria parkinsoni )

TitlePost-fledging migration, age of first return and recruitment, and results of inter-colony translocation of black petrels ( Procellaria parkinsoni )
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2003
AuthorsImber, MJ, McFadden, I, Bell, EA, Scofield, PR
JournalNotornis
Volume50
Issue4
Pagination183-190
Type of Articlepaper
KeywordsAotea, black petrel, Great Barrier Island, Hauturu, Little Barrier Island, migration, post-fledging survival, Procellaria parkinsoni, recruitment, translocation
Abstract

Between 1986 and 1990,249 black petrels (Procellaria parkinsoni) close to fledging were transferred from Aotea (Great Barrier Island) 32 km west to Hauturu (Little Barrier Island) in New Zealand's Hauraki Gulf. At the same time, 50 black petrels of similar age to those transferred were banded as controls on Hauturu and 229 on Aotea. Searches for these birds returning to breeding sites on both islands began in 1991 but three times more search effort was made on more-accessible Aotea. During their first 4.8 years of life at sea the only recovery came from off Ecuador (close to where two 6 year olds were also recovered). Since then to 2001,32 birds have been recaptured or recovered in New Zealand. Most were first recaptured at 5-6 years old and first breeding at 6-7 years old. A maximum of 42% survived to 6 years old. Survival rates of transferred and control birds were similar. The 1990 cohort had significantly better survival than did the 1986-89 cohorts, and this cohort, just 21% of the experimental birds, contributed 43% of chicks known to have been reared by experimental birds to 2001. Neither body mass at departure nor the El Niño-Southern Oscillation was clearly related to this differential survival. Most transferees returned to Aotea; none of the 1986-89 cohorts was found on Hauturu but 2 of the 3 1990 transferees that were recaptured returned to Hauturu. Given that fledglings were always transferred at a similar stage of development, the earliest transfer of heavy fledglings was the most successful.

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