Saturday, October 23, 2021

Widespread ground-nesting in a large population of feral rock pigeons (Columba livia) in a predator-free and urban native forest

TitleWidespread ground-nesting in a large population of feral rock pigeons (Columba livia) in a predator-free and urban native forest
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2021
AuthorsBriskie, JV, Shorey, L
JournalNotornis
Volume68
Issue3
Pagination224-233
Type of ArticleFull article
Keywordsground-nesting, introduced species, nest-site location, New Zealand, population, predation risk, urban environment
Abstract

 

We found widespread nesting on the ground in a large population of feral rock pigeons (Columba livia) in an urban, but predator-free native forest reserve in Christchurch, New Zealand. Ninety-seven percent (n = 77) of rock pigeon nests were located on the ground, with most placed either at the bases of large kahikatea (Dacrycarpus dacrydioides) trees or under a tangle of vines on the forest floor.

Clutch size was 2 eggs in all nests, with a hatching success of 93.9% in nests that survived to the hatch stage. Overall nest success was higher (60.0%) than in other populations of rock pigeons, with half of nest failures attributed to culling of the population that occurred during the course of our study. On average, rock pigeons fledged 1.60 chicks per successful nest. No ground nests were located outside the boundary of the predator- proof fence, suggesting pigeons were able to assess predation risk when selecting nest site location. Ground nesting by rock pigeons may be a way to avoid damage to nests in the canopy by strong winds or predation from aerial predators such as harrier (Circus approximans), which also occur in the reserve. Based on density of nests, we estimated a breeding population of 226 to 258 rock pigeons in the 7.8 ha reserve. The high number of pigeons in the reserve highlights the need for further studies on how populations of introduced species of birds in New Zealand respond to control of mammalian predators and the effect this may have on sympatric native species.

 

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