Tuesday, August 4, 2020

New Zealand pipit (Anthus n. novaeseelandiae) nesting and breeding behaviour in urban Onerahi, Whangarei

TitleNew Zealand pipit (Anthus n. novaeseelandiae) nesting and breeding behaviour in urban Onerahi, Whangarei
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2019
AuthorsBeauchamp, AJ
JournalNotornis
Volume66
Issue4
Pagination200-209
Type of ArticleFull article
Keywordscats, predation, Richard’s Pipit
Abstract

Four New Zealand pipit nesting attempts were monitored in an urban wasteland field in Onerahi, Whangarei.
A female laid two clutches in dense kikuyu (Pennisetum clandestinum) in October and December 2015 and fledged young from both clutches. Pipits were then absent from the site from February until late August 2016. The male reappeared and used the exact same home range, with a new female. This female laid two nests in the more open low gorse (Ulex europaeus) and aristea (Aristea ecklonii) cover in September and October 2016 but both nests were depredated at 3–5 and seven days after hatching, respectively. All three chicks, the female, and possibly the male were killed during the latter predation event. There were differences in adult behaviour throughout the breeding cycle. The female constructed the nest and undertook all the incubation. During the incubation period the male was only present at the nest site in the early morning and did not roost at the site each evening. The pair was present throughout the day after the chicks hatched. Pipits used more frequent calling rates when there was a perceived threat, and when that threat was near a nest.

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