Monday, July 24, 2017

Adult sex ratios in wild orange-fronted parakeet (Cyanoramphus malherbi): are there conservation implications?

TitleAdult sex ratios in wild orange-fronted parakeet (Cyanoramphus malherbi): are there conservation implications?
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2016
AuthorsKearvell, JC, Farley, MR
JournalNotornis
Volume63
Issue1
Pagination26-31
Type of ArticleFull article
Keywordsanthropogenic change, conservation, male-skewed, Orange-fronted Parakeet, sex ratios
Abstract

Many globally threatened bird species have been shown to have highly male-skewed sex ratios. This is concerning for conservation as such populations have a higher extinction risk and lower reproductive population sizes. Our surveys of the remaining populations of orange-fronted parakeet (Cyanoramphus malherbi) indicate this species currently has a non-breeding season adult male population proportion of between 0.56 and 0.66. This male bias increased to between 0.68 and 0.74 during the breeding season. Limited data also suggest that prior to recent declines in the population size of orange-fronted parakeets, driven largely by introduced mammalian predators, the adult sex ratio (ASR) may have been closer to parity. The excess of males indicates that this species currently has a compromised population structure, despite intensive conservation management undertaken since 2000 to limit predation.

AttachmentSize
PDF icon Full article385.93 KB