Monday, June 17, 2019

Habitat use and foraging patterns of a reintroduced population of the South Island saddleback ( Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus ), the first breeding season after release

TitleHabitat use and foraging patterns of a reintroduced population of the South Island saddleback ( Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus ), the first breeding season after release
Publication TypeJournal Article
Year of Publication2001
AuthorsPierre, JF
JournalNotornis
Volume48
Issue2
Pagination63-71
Type of Articlepaper
Keywordsforaging, habitat use, New Zealand, Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus, South Island saddleback, translocation
Abstract

The benefits of monitoring habitat use patterns of translocated populations are widely acknowledged. However, this monitoring seldom occurs. Here, I report the habitat use and foraging patterns of a newly translocated population of South Island saddlebacks (Philesturnus carunculatus carunculatus) on Motuara Island, New Zealand, during the 1st breeding season after release. Reintroduced South Island saddlebacks spent most foraging time on the ground and in Pseudopanax arboreus. Foraging substrates used by male and female saddlebacks differed significantly Saddlebacks focused foraging activities at 0-4 m above ground, and appeared to prefer to forage in larger trees, although the species composition of forested areas did not seem to influence the birds' choices of places to settle. With increasing population density, saddlebacks on Motuara Island may increase their areal foraging eficiency by using a wider range of plant species, vertically stratifying foraging locations within pairs, increasing use of smaller trees for foraging, and possibly by using scrub habitats more extensively South Island saddlebacks appear to be highly adaptable in their choice of foraging sites and this plasticity may enhance the success of translocations.

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